Muistatko vielä Smallville-sarjan kaunottaren Kristin Kreukin, 36? Tältä hän näyttää nyt

Selvästi kirjojen ystävä.

Smallville oli aikoinaan suosittu tv-sarja Teräsmies Clark Kentin (Tom Welling) poikavuosista. Mukana menossa oli myös Lanaa esittänyt Kristin Kreuk.

Näyttelijä tekee edelleen tv-sarjoja. Hänen viimeisin tv-sarjansa on Burden of Truth, jossa hän esitti lakimies Joanna Hanleyta. Muita projekteja hänellä ei ole tällä hetkellä tulossa.

Kreuk jakaa silloin tällöin kuvia Instagramissa elämästään – etenkin silloin, kun hän on lukenut uuden kirjan. Alla potretit.

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This book makes me up to date!!! March's book. "Milkman" by Anna Burns. . I am not entirely sure how to begin describing this novel–set in a small town in Northern Ireland during the Troubles, it lives in the mind of a young woman as she faces and responds to the violence that is ever-present and simmering in her world. When she sparks the interest of a local paramilitary called the milkman, she attracts the attention, ire, and judgement of those in her community placing her in harms way. The voice of Anna Burns as she tells this tale is remarkably original, delightfully odd, and hilarious. And insightful. Also that. . The following excerpt is from early in the book and describes a feeling I have had so often (I imagine many of you have felt this as well)–that someone wants something from me but, as they aren't directly presenting that want, I doubt myself and my judgement, thus allowing that person more access than I would have knowing their true intentions: "I knew by this second meeting that the milkman was attracted to me, that he was making some move on me. I knew I didn't like him being attracted and that I did not feel the same way towards him myself. But he uttered no direct words by way of forwarding on this attraction. Still too, he asked nothing of me. Nor was he physically touching me. Not once so far in this second meeting had he even looked at me. Plus he was older than me, far older, so could it be, I wondered, that I was getting this wrong, that the situation was not as I imagined?" . Background: I was given a book present where I receive a book each month curated by my (really really great) local bookstore. @queenbooksto

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December's book. "The Library Book" by Susan Orlean. (FYI: I'm sharing the books I receive each month from my gifted book subscription. And I am behind. Still. I have yet to read November.) In 1986, there was a massive fire at the Los Angeles Public Library that destroyed hundreds of thousands of books. "The Library Book" uses the mystery of the blaze to tell the story of the characters who populated the library, the history of downtown Los Angeles as seen from the library's vantage point, and, perhaps most importantly, the place a library serves in the system of a community. UNESCO's Public Library Manifesto states, "The library is a prerequisite to let citizens make use of their right to information and freedom of speech. Free access to information is necessary in a democratic society, for open debate and creation of public opinion." But Orlean also elucidates the value of the library for support and community building, from practical educational programs to helping the homeless and impoverished. She says that the "boundary between society and the library is porous; nothing good is kept out of the library, and nothing bad." "In a library, you share a smaller and more intimate space. The communal nature of a library is the very essence of the library, in the shared desks and shared books and shared restrooms." Hope all your Sundays have been fed with a few minutes of 📖!

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June's book. "Go Ahead in the Rain: Notes to A Tribe Called Quest" by Hanif Abdurraqib. . When I was on the verge of 10- or maybe 12- I declared the end of my youth and began a long process of mourning. Mourning playgrounds and tree climbing. Mourning irresponsibility and empty time. That is not to say I stopped doing those things, but I began to engage with them via feelings of nostalgia. Which became my favourite feeling. "Go Ahead in the Rain" is a book of many things, but, for me, one of the most potent is the nostalgia. I began listening to Tribe late in high school due to the recommendation of my friend Ingrid. And I fell in love with rap and hip hop through them. And so, not only was this book a wonderful, soulful read steeped in poetry, it was also a totem enabling me to better access those years of my own life. Abdurraqib maneuvers between the broader history of rap (and the realities of the world and people that inspired it) and how the music impacted the specifics of his life. And he speaks to the ties that bind us through time, to the reality that we do not exist outside of our personal and collective histories. Read the book and listen to the albums. You'll be happy you took the time. . . An excerpt: "Dear Ali Shaheed Muhammad, You will be pleased to know that we did in fact dance to Lucy Pearl underneath the fluorescent lights of Beechcroft High School's gym during a lunch period sock hop that had no business taking place in an afternoon when some of us had to get back to class right after, but we did it anyway. There is something about showing up in a place of learning with fresh sweat sitting on your skin from the flailing of your body up against something as immovable as a school day with more school left on the other side of your flailing."

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